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Some vapes falsely claiming to be ‘nicotine-free’ are being sold on Britain’s high streets, an analysis has revealed.

InterScientific – which tests products to ensure they comply with regulations – examined more than 50 vape brands sold across England and Wales.

Eight of the devices, marketed as having no addictive substance, sold in high street shops, actually contain nicotine, and one packs the same amount as full-strength e-cigarettes.

This blackcurrant-flavored option packs a punch, even though the packaging suggests it doesn’t have any.

On top of that, the investigation identified dozens of vapers with tank sizes too large, more than double the legal limit.

According to the current regulations, the volume of the vape tank should not exceed 2ml, the legal limit of nicotine is set at 2% or 20mg/ml.  But one device was more than 50 percent above the legal limit, and eight other supposedly nicotine-free products contained the substance, according to Interscientific.

According to the current regulations, the volume of the vape tank should not exceed 2ml, the legal limit of nicotine is set at 2% or 20mg/ml. But one device was more than 50 percent above the legal limit, and eight other supposedly nicotine-free products contained the substance, according to Interscientific.

Laboratory analysis of 52 products bought in the UK found 73 per cent exceeded the 2ml capacity limit.  The products were sold in stores in Birmingham, Staffordshire, Dudley, Liverpool, Newcastle, Hertfordshire and Wales, Inter Scientific said.  A MailOnline investigation earlier this month found Chupa Chups, Jolly Rancher, Calypso and Rubicon 'dupes' all on Oxford Street (pictured).

Laboratory analysis of 52 products bought in the UK found 73 per cent exceeded the 2ml capacity limit. The products were sold in stores in Birmingham, Staffordshire, Dudley, Liverpool, Newcastle, Hertfordshire and Wales, Inter Scientific said. A MailOnline investigation earlier this month found ‘dupes’ of Chupa Chups, Jolly Rancher, Calypso and Rubicon – all on Oxford Street (pictured).

According to the current regulations, the size of the vape tank should not exceed 2 ml, the legal limit of nicotine is set at 2 percent or 20mg / ml.

Any vapes with contents greater than these amounts are illegal and should not be sold to the public, regulators say.

But Interscientific Dr. Gorilla King, who shared the data with The Guardian, found that the blackcurrant wine slush contained 19.7mg/ml of nicotine despite being supposed to be nicotine-free.

Seven other devices that claim to be nicotine-free also contain the substance, according to Interscientific.

The product tester found 73% of 52 vapes purchased in the UK exceeded the legal 2ml tank capacity.

And more than 40 percent of vapes contain 5 milliliters of liquid or more — more than twice the legal limit.

Additionally, the product with the highest nicotine content – Vape With a Bang Havana Tobacco 6 percent disposable device – was found to contain 29.35mg/ml.

This is beyond the legal limit.

The products were sold in stores in Birmingham, Staffordshire, Dudley, Liverpool, Newcastle, Hertfordshire and Wales, Inter Scientific said.

MailOnline was unable to contact the product manufacturers for comment.

None of the products are listed in the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, which has a notification scheme for vapes so any harm caused by the devices is recorded.

InterScientific is working with Trading Standards to tackle the sale of illegal products flooding high street stores.

In the last six months of 2022, more than 1.4 tonnes of illegal vape were seized in the North East of England alone.

David Lawson, chief executive and regulatory affairs specialist at InterScientific, told The Guardian: “We have seen a significant increase in the number of illegal vape products being seized at marketing levels and sent for analysis.

Although these products do not pose an immediate health risk, they are breaking UK law.’

It comes as Health Secretary Neil O’Brien announced plans last week to curb the sale of e-cigarettes to children under 18, amid growing concerns that children are being vaped.

NHS data for 2021 shows that 9 per cent of children aged 11 to 15 use e-cigarettes, up from 6 per cent in 2018.

NHS digital data shows that the number of children who are current vapers has increased in recent years, jumping from 6% in 2018 to 9% in 2021.

NHS digital data shows that the number of children who are current vapers has increased in recent years, jumping from 6% in 2018 to 9% in 2021.

Khan's review, published in July last year, included 15 recommendations to help the UK become smoke-free by 2030.

Khan’s review, published in July last year, included 15 recommendations to help the UK become smoke-free by 2030.

Experts have expressed concern that children are not fully aware of the contents of e-cigarettes, with many so worried about the next 'fix' that they are begging teachers to allow them to vape at school.

Experts have expressed concern that children are not fully aware of the contents of e-cigarettes, with many so worried about the next ‘fix’ that they are begging teachers to allow them to vape at school.

But under the anti-smoking push, one million smokers will get an e-cig ‘starter kit’ as part of a ‘switch to quit’ scheme.

Almost one in five smokers in England are to be offered free cigarettes at an estimated cost of £45m over two years.

Health chiefs hope the world-first policy will make England smoke-free despite mounting evidence of the health risks of inhaling.

Almost every high street in the country has a dedicated shop where e-cigs, costing up to £5, are available for demonstrations.

Around 6 million people in the UK smoke and it is estimated that 64,000 people die every year.

It costs the NHS £2.4 billion each year to treat smoking-related conditions.

Prices have fallen over the past decade, but still not enough to reach the smoke-free goal, experts say.

But vaping rates have exploded at the same time.

According to a study conducted by researchers from the Medical University of Silesia in Poland, e-cigarettes still contain harmful toxins.

And their long-term effects on health remain a mystery, with some doctors fearing lung disease and even cancer in the coming decades.

Experts worry that high levels of nicotine can cause high blood pressure and other heart problems.

In February Major retailers have stopped selling Elf Bar vapes after a mail-in investigation found the company was breaking the law on nicotine limits.

Tesco, Sainsbury’s and WH Smith have withdrawn all Elf Bar products and Morrisons and Asda have pulled the high-end Elf Bar 600 range from their shelves.

It comes after independent laboratory tests revealed by the Mail that 600 lines of e-cigarettes contain at least 50 percent of the legal limit of nicotine in e-liquids.

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